Monthly Archives: February 2017

Ian Johnson to speak at conference on ‘The Medieval Translator’

From 15th to 18th March 2017 Ian Johnson will be attending the Eleventh Cardiff Conference on the Theory and Practice of Translation in the Middle Ages, The Medieval Translator: Medieval Translations and their Readership, hosted by the Austrian Academy of Sciences/ÖAW, Institute for Medieval Research, Vienna. Ian will be speaking on “Rendering Readers’ Soulscapes: Variant Translation of Interiority in Late Medieval English and Scottish Literary Culture”. This paper addresses the issue of how in late medieval English and Scottish literary culture each choice of translation — down to the smallest preposition, modulation of tone or shift of voice — affects the configuration of reader interiorities, especially in contemplative, meditative or allegorical works.

Medieval French Research Seminar 20th April

Prof. Bill Burgwinkle (Cambridge): “Thirteenth-century troubadour poetry and the rise of post-evental thinking”

Thursday 20th April (week 11), 5.15pm, Buchanan Building, Room 216 (TBC)

The importance that is claimed for troubadour poetry often involves its status as the ‘first’: first vernacular lyric poetry preserved in Europe; earliest vernacular poetry composed by a woman; earliest preserved melodies for a ‘secular’ composition; first explicitly non-religious verse, and plenty of it (some 2500 songs from a period of roughly a century); first to deal almost exclusively with love and the erotic without offering apologies.  That this material has survived, was copied in luxury manuscripts, was imitated widely, and still resonates is amazing and I do not question that; but that is not what interests me most about this production or this phenomenon.  Instead, I want to look at fin’amors as a sample of discourse or a discursive formation (à la Foucault), and read it as emerging from an ‘event’ (à la Badiou).  It is when that discourse founders, when the rituals which uphold these beliefs begin to weaken and cracks appear in the notion that there can be just one account of that event—that is when things get most interesting.  For that we should look to the borders of Occitania, in what is now northern Italy and Catalonia.  It is in those regions and in some of the poets who hailed from the Piedmont, Genoa, and South of the Pyrenees that we find some of the most intriguing material and it is on those spaces and poets that I will focus in this paper.

Publication! Medieval St Andrews

Medieval St Andrews: Church, Cult, City edited by Michael Brown and Katie Stevenson has just been published by Boydell. It contains 15 essays including pieces by Julian Luxford, Bess Rhodes, Roger Mason, Richard Fawcett and Norman Reid all of St Andrews.

From the website:medieval-st-andrews-2

St Andrews was of tremendous significance in medieval Scotland. Its importance remains readily apparent in the buildings which cluster the rocky promontory jutting out into the North Sea: the towers and walls of cathedral, castle and university provide reminders of the status and wealth of the city in the Middle Ages. As a centre of earthly and spiritual government, as the place of veneration for Scotland’s patron saint and as an ancient seat of learning, St Andrews was the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland.
This volume provides the first full study of this special and multi-faceted centre throughout its golden age. The fourteen chapters use St Andrews as a focus for the discussion of multiple aspects of medieval life in Scotland. They examine church, spirituality, urban society and learning in a specific context from the seventh to the sixteenth century, allowing for the consideration of St Andrews alongside other great religious and political centres of medieval Europe.

You can read more about this publication here: https://boydellandbrewer.com/medieval-st-andrews-hb.html

Donald Bullough Fellowship Applications

The Department of Mediaeval History at the University of St Andrews invites applications for the Donald Bullough Fellowship, to be taken up during either semester of the academic year 2017-2018.

The Fellowship is open to any academic in a permanent university post with research interests in mediaeval history. The financial aspect of the fellowship is a subsidy (up to £3000) towards the cost of travel to St Andrews and accommodation during your stay. The successful applicant is normally someone enjoying research leave from their own Institution. Previous Fellows have included Dr Christina Pössel, Professor Cynthia Neville, Dr Ross Balzaretti, Dr Marlene Hennessy, Professor Warren Brown, Dr Edward Coleman, Professor Richard Kaeuper and Dr Natasha Hodgson. The fellowship is currently held by Professor Jacqueline Murray.

The Fellowship carries with it no teaching duties, though the Fellow is expected to take part in the normal seminar life of the mediaeval historians during their stay in St Andrews. Weekly seminars, held on a Monday evening, run from September–December, and February–May. You will also be invited to lead a workshop on your chosen research theme during your stay. Fellows are provided with computing facilities and an office alongside the mediaeval historians in the Department. The university library has an excellent collection for mediaeval historians.

You should send a letter of application by the advertised closing date, together with a scheme of research for the project on which you will be engaged during your time in St Andrews.  You should also enclose a CV, together with the names of two academic referees, who should be asked to write by the closing date. All correspondence should be addressed to medhist@st-andrews.ac.uk

The closing date for applications is 7 April 2017. Previous applicants should not be deterred from applying.

Further enquiries may be addressed to the Departmental Chair, Dr Rory Cox

(rwscc@st-andrews.ac.uk).